The Gilder:

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Gilding involves the mechanical application of gold leaf and other metal leaf to metallic and non-metallic surfaces. There are two main techniques: water gilding and oil gilding. The craft of gold leaf gilding has been practiced since Antiquity. One can still find well-preserved gold on the coffins and mummies in Egyptian tombs. By contrast, Greek gilding has all but disappeared. Only written sources make reference to the common usage of ornamental gilding on private and public buildings. Pliny gives a description of the gilding practice of the Romans with details about the technique they used.
In Austria a gilder’s training involves a three-year apprenticeship.

At our construction sites there is always plenty of work for gilders. Hardly a monument since the Renaissance has been erected without a flourish of gold, and practically every representation of a saint has his or her golden attribute. Gilders clean and retouch historical gilding and their undercoats and reapply gold leaf to surfaces where the gilding is badly damaged or has worn off completely.

Gilder:

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Tasks:

Cleaning, preparing the undercoat, gilding, retouching

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Photo Gallery

Heldendenkmal der Roten Armee

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Vienna, Haus der Industrie

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Vienna, Haus der Industrie

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Vermählungsbrunnes Brunnen

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Vienna, Pestsäule am Graben

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Vienna, Pestsäule am Graben

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Last updated: 07/07/2015  Imprint ©2015 Denkmalpflege G.m.b.H. & Mag. Klaus Wedenig Restaurierung & Konservierung